Thursday, 23 June 2016

Co Cork Ancestry - Clonakilty

Clonakilty is one of the most popular towns in Co. Cork. Many tourists visit 'Clon' each year. The local town is surrounded by hills and beaches.

Researchers flock to 'Clon' as the town is central to all parishes in West Cork. Clonakilty's R.C. parish records date back to 1810. Other denominations are represented and you can email me for further information. 

The area is full of history. One of Ireland's most famous sons, Michael Collins  , was born just outside of the town.

Researchers and visitors are well catered for in the town. There are many Hotels and restaurants . Click on highlighted links for information.

If you have any questions on visiting the area, you are most welcome to contact me via email



Tuesday, 21 June 2016

Co Cork Ancestry - Kinsale

Kinsale is situated less than 20 miles (28kms) south of Cork City. 

The town has so much interesting history. The most significant part of Kinsale's past was the 'Battle of Kinsale' in 1601. This proved to be  England's full conquest of Gaelic Ireland.

R.C. parish records date back to the very early 1800's. You can email me for further information on other denominations. Kinsale is ideally situated to visit many surrounding parishes.

Kinsale is considered the gourmet capital of Ireland. Superb restaurants are easily located in this small town.

The town is a huge attraction to tourists. Excellent hotels are also situated in the heart of the town, with magnificent views of the harbour. 

Please email me if you have further questions.





Wednesday, 8 June 2016

Cork to Mississippi


I was recently asked if I could research the Irish side of a family from Mississippi. 

I had the following information to go by. 

Michael O'Leary born c1882 from Co.Cork, Ireland. Luckily enough, I had a townland to go by. O'Leary is a very common surname in Cork. I was sure I could obtain a record, proving it was  Michael was another thing. 

After a few weeks, I was able to obtain a baptismal cert.for 'our' Michael. I had no parents to go by, and I certainly wasn't going to put my name to a 'might be.'

In the margin of the baptismal register, there was more information.
More information is added if a 'letter of freedom' was sought.

My Latin isn't perfect. The writing was difficult to read also. I have added what was transcribed from the original register - 

Prodictus Michael Leary mat contracit cum Mollie L Pradal mEce S IommEnglisa Dioceis Natche Tulfort Miss. U.S.A. al Rev H. Spenger 15th April 1917.

*I was well pleased with discovering this record, also the extra information of Michael's parents.


Wednesday, 6 April 2016

Heraldry - Coat of Arms

I do not usually write about this topic. However, when I do come across interesting  information, I do like to share it.

I have often come across websites promoting 'Family Crests.' A term I always found misleading. 

A Coat of Arms was presented to an individual, not a family. I have been reading up on the subject on a website Click Here which I can recommend. 

There can be many Arms for one name, with a lot  originating from various countries. Hundreds of Irish names are to be added over the coming months. Take a look at the above link. 

I have added  three examples below. There are over 8,000 names on  the database. Perhaps you can suggest your or friends names via  email . I have passed on the link to a few friends, please do the same.























Wednesday, 24 February 2016

Co Cork Researchers



I have of late been advising researchers who plan on visiting Co. Cork. What many researchers are looking for is a central town in Co Cork with easy access to most parts of the County.

The town of Ballincollig is less than 6 miles to Cork City. The same distance to Blarney Castle and 15 miles to Bandon which is  the gateway to West Cork. Killarney, Co Kerry is just over an hour’s drive away.

The town offers  The Oriel House Hotel which I highly recommend for comfort with excellent rates and offers. 

Ballincollig is very near the County Reference Library (less than a 10 minute drive) which is a must for all researchers.

Please feel free to email if you have any enquiries.

Tuesday, 29 December 2015

Researching your Ancestry and 2016

Researchers visiting Ireland in 2016 are coming at a very special time.

Ireland is celebrating the centenary of the Easter Rising of 1916. This is a huge date for the people of Ireland and will be marked throughout the country.

Over the next couple of weeks, I will be adding  information and advice daily. Where to research, places of interest to visit, accommodation and where to socialise also. I will cover most counties. You can also email directly.

I can also recommend that from St. Patrick's Day - March 17th, a new movie is being released in Ireland & the USA. The film is centred on The Rising of 1916. An excellent cast and a must for all those with Irish connections.

Any researchers or visitors visiting Co. Cork, I strongly recommend a visit to Cork City Gaol. The museum is a 20-minute walk from the main thoroughfare in Cork City. The gaol has a long history which you can read at the link given. Out of personal interest, my children's great-grandfather was imprisoned there 1922-23. He was an anti-treaty supporter.
To mark the 1916-2016 centenary, through the good people at the museum, I am offering a free pass for a family of 2 adults and up to children. If you email me I will include you in the draw for this free pass. If anyone would like a discount voucher for two, email and I'll gladly pass on.
Please check this blog often for almost daily updates.

Travel between all towns and cities are possible and reliable. If you'd like to rent your own transport, I recommend Car Hire Click on link.

Wednesday, 9 December 2015

Visiting Ireland? Genealogy

Many thousands of Genealogists from all over the world are now visiting Ireland. 

I am often asked for information on transport, accommodation, parishes, counties and records etc.

For those of you who are planning to visit Ireland, it's more than helpful to have someone resident in Ireland to assist you.

If you would like to contact me EMAIL we can discuss your plans.

Though I am based in Co. Cork, I can give information covering the 32 counties.

Whether you are a researcher in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand or South Africa, I look forward to hearing from you. 

Tuesday, 21 July 2015

When is a Record not a Record?



We all come up against difficulties in our research. After many years, I thought I had seen it all.

Recently I was tracking a birth from 1879 in a rural parish of Co Cork.

I obtained the civil birth certificate. Name, dates, address etc. all correct. I was then curious enough to try to locate the baptism. One to five 5 days after the birth, I should find him easy enough. No sign of him!

I then thought to myself that perhaps the informant was confused. I checked further back,4 days prior to the birth I thought I had found him. Much to my amazement, instead of seeing a Michael, I saw Bridget! Same parents and  same address.  

I had a Michael with  a birth cert. but no baptism. I had a Bridget's baptism with no birth cert. What would you go for? They are both official records.

I had spent a number of days researching, I have now proved Michael in 1879 beyond doubt.

The Priest must have made a mistake. Most people think of a couple baptising their child one or two days after the birth in the local church.

1. The mother wouldn't be there, There was a tradition of the Mother not attending church for a month. The church gave the mother a "special blessing" after the month. Basically the church thought her as "unclean",

2. Many children were baptised at home. If the child was weak, and there was a chance the baby wouldn't make it, it was common that the woman delivering the baby could baptise the child. 

The notes of the baptims of those baptised at home might have been kept and then added into the register at a later stage. I believe this is where the mistake was made.

I did think of different scenarios, including twins. One registered and one not, also one baptised the other not. That was too unlikely.

I'm happy enough now that I have found Michael. Michael appears with family members in the 1901 census, I obtained all details from his marriage certificate and I know where he was buried.

The only reference to a Bridget is the baptism, which I now know  is incorrect.


All of the above goes to show that more than the one record is needed if possible. No matter how unlikely the scenario. 

 Email me! click here 

Saturday, 18 July 2015

Cork Parish Records

St Mary's & St Anne's RC Cathedral (The North Cathedral) is situated on the northside of Cork City.

The records available are from the 1700's to c1900 - baptisms & marriages. These records amount to hundreds of thousands in number.

These records are not available online. 

If anyone would like me to search these records I will gladly do so. I would only ask for a small amount to cover travel costs.

The link to email me is below.



Email me! click here

Wednesday, 15 July 2015

Death Records in Irish Parish Registers.

I am listing Irish Parish Registers that contain death records. I will also add same for confirmations.

Stamullen, Co Meath, deaths are available Jan. 1834 - June 1873.

Rathnure & Templeudigan, Co Wexford, deaths are available October 1846 - October 1880. They also have confirmations 1853 - 1875.

Enniscorthy, Co Wexford, Deaths - 1815 - 1880 name and age in early years, address is recorded much later. 


 Adamstown, Co Wexford, Deaths - Sept. 1823 - Jan. 1832. 





This is an ongoing project. Email me! click here